Balance 2.0?

So, a wannabe author/writer walks in to a writer’s conference…

Sounds like the beginning of a not very funny joke.  But, that was me earlier this month as I attended the Harvard’s Writing, Publishing and Social Media Conference for Healthcare Professionals.  Quite a busy three days. Started at 7AM and  finished after 8PM. A lot to learn and absorb: Improving writing style, understanding the publishing and self-publishing landscape, using social media effectively and with purpose.  During the three days, met some great people that I now know in IRL (in real life).

There were so many take aways but a few things did strike a chord and stand out.

  1. This blog is “static.” Once or twice a month I write something. Probably a little too long and a little too moody (more on that in a minute). Right now, it’s really a one-way communication between myself and you the reader. I would like there to be more engagement and build on what I have started. I would like to provide more content that hopefully YOU the reader find either useful and interesting or entertaining.

 

  1. So I am asking you, the reader, what more you would like to see? How can I  make this more of a two-way conversation? I am looking to post:

 

  • Shorter thoughts and musings on life and themes such as burnout.
  • Write on End of life issues / advance care planning / introduce thought leaders and game changers in this space
  • Timely topics of the day.
  • Interesting book reviews or articles in paper or journals on critical care, end of life care, burnout.
  • Guest bloggers with strong clear voices on interesting and important topics.

 

  1. The last part that threw me for a loop was how morose or weighty my writing must feel to most people. I often dismiss as a joke, when my long-time friends send me a text checking in to make sure I am ok after a typical post. During the conference, it was commented on that IRL I seem different than the “voice” that comes across on the blog (ie: I have a sense of humor, funny/sarcastic and quite social instead of morose, melancholy, moody or morose)

So, to be brief, my BLOG and website is a work in progress (similar to my life in general). But I hope to grow it into something more.  So maybe call it Balance Redux, or Balance 2.0

Come to think of it, lets get this conversation started.  Thoughts on a new name? Anyone….

We Failed Her

The alarm sounds, a painful reminder that it’s my week to cover the ICU. I take off my favorite sweatshirt, stripping away its warmth and comfort. I quickly jump into and out of the scalding shower, racing to get ready. Making my way toward the kitchen, I roll my eyes at my teenage daughter who is eating ice cream and waffles for breakfast. Her ride waits out front but before she can escape, I get a rare hug, her wet hair cool as it brushes against my cheek. I spy her melting, unfinished breakfast and I shovel what’s left into my mouth. The cold vanilla ice cream and maple syrup drips down my chin. Wiping away the evidence of my indiscretion, I get into my jeep with the top down. The twenty-minute ride is a guilty pleasure, with the spring air cool across my face. The coffee in my hand warms me from the inside out as I make my way to work. Read more

His Voice

I pause in front of the door. On the other side, you all wait. A spouse, sons and daughters, sometimes with their own small children in tow. Today it’s your husband and father you have come for. Yesterday it was someone else’s mother. You have come from near and far, across the street and the country. Your weary eyes are unable to mask your sadness. Over the past week, you have witnessed a steady stream of nurses, residents, phlebotomists and x-ray techs file in and out of his room.  Your dad has withstood a barrage of insults to his body.  Radiation to his chest for daily x-rays. Needles piercing skin and veins for IVs and blood draws. Catheters inserted in his neck, his groin and his bladder. Still you hold on to a cautious optimism, clinging to hope. But family meetings usually imply things are not going well, and today is no exception. Taking a deep breath, I open the door and walk inside, leaving for now, the rest of the world behind.  Read more

Sunrise

What do you do when you know someone is going to die? I’m not talking about death when it comes at the end of a long protracted illness or a terminal diagnosis. Or the final act at the end of a “good” life, when the body and mind have ultimately given way. I’m talking about when you realize the twenty-five-year-old woman in front of you, who you met five minutes ago, has no idea she will not survive to see another sunrise.

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