Defending the Lob, Managing the ICU and Emotional Intelligence

The lob shot.

As a goalie, it’s my nemesis. It was my major weakness in college and even more so today. Standing (or more appropriately treading) 6’3″ tall, with an even longer wingspan, I have always been eager and ready to explode up and out of the water, my arms outstretched, to intimidate a shooter. My height, along with my gangly arms and a quick first reaction, are great tools to disrupt, alter and ultimately block my opponents’ shots.

But my kryptonite is the lob shot. It turns my strength against me. A patient opposing player, by waiting a split second, lets my aggressiveness work against me. By allowing me to rise up and out of the water first, a shooter can then release an agonizingly slow arcing shot, up and over my now sinking self, to then drop into the opposite corner of the net. I react. They wait. And I’m beat.

When I correctly anticipate the lob, it’s demoralizing for the shooter. With minimal effort, the ball is not so much blocked as “caught” in humiliating fashion, usually deterring the shooter from another. But when my legs have already committed to a direct shot, all I can do is swivel my head and watch as the ball takes its time, teasing and taunting me, just out of arms reach, and lands in the net.

In college, it took a while to develop patience. To dial back my brashness, my impulsivity. Wait that extra split second. Take in the arm angle and the eyes of the shooter. Trust myself and my abilities to make the block even if I delay for a brief moment. My teammates challenged me with lobs over and over again in practice, until finally a change occurred. Thinking, instead of just reacting. Using my frontal cortex, instead of my primitive brain. And for a while, I had the upper hand against my nemesis, and my opponents as well.

Tempering my first reaction has never been easy, either in or out of the water. My initial response to life’s challenges tend to be more reactionary and visceral. In one’s college years, that lack of patience and emotional intelligence is somewhat expected, if not the norm. Not so much when in mid-life and caring for the critically ill or teenage children.

The ICU will never be mistaken for an Olympic sized pool. And my children, despite how it may feel, are not opponents on a challenging team. But the unique nature of an ICU and family dynamics make both areas ripe with opportunities for a battle between my brash, impulsive tendencies and my more mature, deliberate and thoughtful side.

The space that exists within the confines of the ICU is awash with challenges. Rooms are filled with the tension that accompanies the acuity and intensity of critical illness. ICU physicians are tasked with navigating multiple health care professionals, who frequently have honest differences in opinions, and sometimes supercharged egos and attitudes as well. Families and surrogates of patients, residents, nurses and students all operate in this landscape, within their own sphere of swirled thoughts and emotions. There are a multitude of relatively quick decisions that need to be made. Do I intubate or not? Do I send them on a road trip for a CT or stay in the more stable confines of the critical care unit? Do I commit a patient to an invasive procedure with potential complications or hold off and continue with the status quo?  But it’s not just the decisions themselves. There is a qualitative component as well. Do I take the extra time to explain my thought process to the nurse, resident or student at the cost of delaying decisions for the next patient? Do I provide more than a cursory update to a family as I exit a room, or do I sit down and invite them to share their angst and fear. Do I do so at the cost of delaying the start of my office and the patients waiting there? Do I share my inner head voice and its whispers of fear, concerns and self-doubt? Or do I project unwavering confidence and certainty? Challenges lie not just in making decisions, but in the manner they are carried out and executed. To grow, not just as a competent clinical doctor, but as an empathic physician as well, one needs emotional intelligence to navigate such complex waters.

These days, back in the pool, I find my old nemesis is back to taunt and haunt me. My height and wingspan may be unchanged, but the same cannot be said about my explosive move up and out of the water. Over-eager and anxious to defend a shot on goal, I now have the added challenge of being a bit slower and quite lower out of the water. I don’t have the luxury of waiting that split second anymore.

I find history repeating itself, with my current teammates showing the way. They challenge me in practice, frustrating me with lob after lob. But they are not content to stop there. They let me know that I may be the only one in the net, but I am not alone in defending it. Through their efforts in games, fighting for position, and playing a team defense, they buy me back the time I have lost. They remind me to trust them. And in turn, trust myself, allowing me to tap into my thinking brain in order to defend the lob.

My experiences with the team continue to parallel my life. Just like success in the net is a result of a team effort, so it goes in the ICU. I’d be lying if I said the years have not affected the excitement and enthusiasm of the young attending physician I used to be. There is now a component of fatigue and burnout that I often need to shake off before rounds. Some days it feels that I am on an island when dealing with a crisis or challenge. That is neither true nor accurate. The nurses, residents and students, along with my physician partners are teammates too. Together, the challenge of taking care of the critically ill seems less daunting, giving me the time and space to harness my thinking brain.

There are moments when instinct and gut reactions are critical for success. But when I am able to bring both parts of my brain to a challenge, the enthusiasm that comes with  impulsivity and brashness along with the wisdom that accompanies maturity and thoughtfulness, good things happen. Not just in the pool or ICU, but in life as well.


“Doctor…She wants a chance. She wants to live!”

“Doctor…She wants a chance. She wants to live!”

How often have I heard those words? Or some version of them? The location of the conversations varies. I might be standing outside the curtain of an emergency room bay or sitting on a worn chair inside a cramped waiting room adjacent to the ICU. Possibly on the phone in the dark of my bedroom at some pre-dawn hour. Those words, coming from the mouth of a spouse, a child, or a sibling are usually imploring and pleading and occasionally defiant and demanding. But always beneath the surface, at its origin, is fear.

Critical illness, almost by definition, does not come on slowly. Occasionally it starts as a quiet whisper, allowing time for patients and families to absorb and adjust. But all too often, it presents as a roar. Infection takes hold and explodes. A vessel once open becomes completely blocked. A beating heart suddenly arrests. An aneurysm ruptures and bleeds into the brain or belly. An accident or trauma, completely unforeseen, literally crashes into a life.

The brutal and cruel physiological disruption these insults cause a patient are usually obvious to both the care team and the family. But the additional traumas to the family and friends left to make decisions in the wake of critical illnesses are more subtle.

Some choices can be relatively simple, like placing large IV’s or draining a collection of infected fluid. But what about issues of life sustaining or death preventing treatments such as ventilators for breathing, powerful infusions of medicines to make the heart beat quicker and squeeze stronger, a machine outside the body to filter and clean the blood the kidney cannot, or chest compressions and electric shocks when the heart completely stops? These decisions are literally of life and death. And as physicians look to surrogates to help guide our interventions, we often ask, “What would the patient want?”

“Doctor…She wants a chance. She would want to live!”

And there lies the dilemma.

A chance to live. It seems like a straightforward statement.

Critical care is an amazing field. With appropriate aggressive intervention we are often able to halt the progression of and stabilize dangerously low blood pressure or oxygen levels. We can cool a patient’s core body temperature to protect injury to the brain, perform emergency surgery to repair leaks in large arteries or perforations of parts of the bowel.

But what does it mean to say we want to live?

Is it just a heart that beats? Lungs filling with air while lying in bed? Skin warm and damp on hospital sheets? Liquid calories delivered to the stomach by a plastic tube? A hand held by family sitting at the bedside? Light filtering through a window, giving just a glimpse of what lies on the other side?

Or is it a heart able to soar with love or ache from loss? To breath in air while laughing or crying? Sweat dripping from a brow, stinging the eyes, while working hard in the yard on a hot and humid summer day? A stomach full, from one too many pieces of Chicago style pizza, or a brain buzzing from that first morning cup of coffee? To be able to hug or be hugged and feel the warmth of an embrace on the surface of your skin and on your spirit?

And there are an infinite number of possibilities between these two extremes. Our interventions are often good at preventing death. But not always as effective at helping us live. And what is living? To you? To me? In my thirties with young children still to raised? In my seventies with grandkids to watch grow? What is enough quality in life to lift our hearts up high, when our bodies are still tethered to the bed?

Most of us only glance at these questions. To see them obliquely. Set them aside to deal with tomorrow. And the sequence of routines in our day to day lives help us do that, beginning with the starting gun of the morning alarm. The routine drive to work where we put in our time. Then the race to a soccer practice or baseball game and dinner on the go. Help with homework, pay some bills, read some emails, off to bed and then repeat. On our way to the next job, the next raise, the next game, the next tournament. All with our distracting smart phones in hand. To photograph, to read and reply, to text and tweet.

These questions about what makes life worth living are complicated. Not only do they make us recognize our own mortality, they also force us to confront the lack of mindfulness in our day to day lives. To separate patterns and routines from what is purposeful and meaningful.

By answering these questions directly, we can create two powerful gifts. The first is for our families, loved ones and surrogates. Having discussions with them ahead of time decreases their burden, by providing a better understanding of what it is that makes life worth living. So they may be more prepared to speak for us, if and when we cannot.

The second gift is to ourselves. Not for the future, but for the here and now. As we recognize what gives us purpose and meaning in moments of mindfulness, we learn what we want to do, not what we feel obliged to do. And in doing so, we then learn what truly makes our hearts soar.

We Failed Her

The alarm sounds, a painful reminder that it’s my week to cover the ICU. I take off my favorite sweatshirt, stripping away its warmth and comfort. I quickly jump into and out of the scalding shower, racing to get ready. Making my way toward the kitchen, I roll my eyes at my teenage daughter who is eating ice cream and waffles for breakfast. Her ride waits out front but before she can escape, I get a rare hug, her wet hair cool as it brushes against my cheek. I spy her melting, unfinished breakfast and I shovel what’s left into my mouth. The cold vanilla ice cream and maple syrup drips down my chin. Wiping away the evidence of my indiscretion, I get into my jeep with the top down. The twenty-minute ride is a guilty pleasure, with the spring air cool across my face. The coffee in my hand warms me from the inside out as I make my way to work. Read more

Injuries of the Heart

He sat next to the judge in the witness chair. Of medium height and build with a clean shaven head, he recalled the night in the hospital where he lost his dad, role model, grandfather to his newborn son and best friend. In the small courtroom he spoke directly to the jury about the fear and apprehension the night his father was admitted to the ICU. He talked about the pain his father experienced just before his eyes rolled up in his head. He recounted running into the hallway, desperate, yelling for a nurse, for anyone to come to his father’s aid. He described the profound loss, the hole left in his family’s life after his father arrested and died that night, five years ago. I was sitting 15 feet away, almost directly in front of and facing this gentleman. Because the hospital and I were on trial for the wrongful death of his dad.  Read more